Home > IT controls, SOC 1, SSAE 16, Uncategorized > Beyond SSAE 16 Certified

Beyond SSAE 16 Certified

All I can say is, “Wow”.  In my inbox this morning was a press release from Verian, a “world leader in universal purchasing and invoice processing systems” with a headline that states “Verian Recognized by AICPA for Delivering Highest Levels of Quality and Security”. Of course I had to see what that was all about.

Turns out, Verian completed an SSAE 16 attestation. Nothing in the accompanying press release says anything about special recognition from the AICPA. The press release goes on to talk about the value of the SOC 1 report and why all their customers can trust them because “The completion of the SOC 1 Type ll examination typifies Verian’s continued commitment to create and maintain the most stringent controls needed to ensure the highest quality and security of services provided to their customers.”

That “may” be true but it certainly does not indicate that the AICPA provided any special recognition of Verian’s quality and security. I can understand why the company wants to issue a press release to announce the completion of the SSAE 16 attestation. But to announce it as recognition from the AICPA is over the top. This goes way beyond saying you are “SSAE 16 Certified”.

Major AwardThe average reader would assume that this SSAE 16 must be a “major award” from the AICPA when in fact it is nothing more than an independent attestation that Verian does what they describe in their own description of their own controls over their system.

I recognize that marketing people get paid to create press releases and that headlines are what attracts people to read them. Hey, it worked on me.  But this headline is misleading and over the top.  So all you marketing people, please don’t try to mislead your customers and potential customers with flamboyant claims about special recognition. Doing so just further diminishes the value of a well written SSAE 16 report.

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  1. August 13, 2012 at 9:55 AM | #1

    When is the FTC going to get involved in these false advertisements? That’s what I want to know. For more examples of misleading claims, please check out the list I’ve been keeping track of here: http://www.riskassuranceguy.com/2012/01/when-i-see-can-in-road-all-i-want-to-do.html

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